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Japanese Invasion Money Part 6: Philippines

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Japanese Invasion Money Part 6: Philippines

On April 19, 2016, Posted by , In Japanese Invasion Money (JIM), With Comments Off on Japanese Invasion Money Part 6: Philippines

The Philippines fell to the Japanese in 1942.

The Philippine JIM series is somewhat complex, like Malaya. To begin there were 2 series of notes released for the Philippines. The first series contained both peso and centavos denominated notes and only had block letters or fractional block letters. The second later series were considered an inflationary series. There were no centavos denominated notes for this series, and it contained larger denominations (100 Pesos through 1000 Pesos). The second series both had block letters and serial numbers. There are many varieties, and an interesting series of counterfeits, as well, which will be discussed in a later post. There are also specimens of many notes but these will not be listed here.

Series 1 – The Fractional Notes (Centavos)

From the first issues series the fractional pesos (centavos) notes, were lithographed and only of fair quality.

All fractional Philippines JIM notes have red block letters (PA) or fractional block letters (P/AA). The issues in denominations of 50 centavos and higher have a quatrefoil watermark which is a flower with four petals and described in part 1 of this series. 

  • Fractional notes are available in 1, 5, 10 and 50 centavos denominations.
  • The face of the notes has “THE JAPANESE GOVERNMENT” and the denomination spelled out and in repeating numerals. (These design elements are common among all the JIM notes issues by Japan and are discussed with truther detail in part 1 of this series.)
  • The backs have repeating numerals on an ornate design.
  • There is no watermark on the 1, 5 & 10 centavos notes.
  • The 50 centavos has a plantation vignette on the right of the face and carries a quatrefoil watermark and was never issued with fractional block letters.

Varieties for the fractional (centavos) Philippines JIM Notes are

Japanese Invasion Money Philippines Fractional Type List

(for an explanation of block & fractional block letters read Part 1 )

Series 2 – The Peso Denominated JIM notes

The first series of Peso denominated notes were printed in denominations of 1, 5 and 10 Pesos.  Again, the face has “THE JAPANESE GOVERNMENT”, as well as the denomination spelled out and in numeral form repeated around the bill. 

  • The 1 peso has a plantation scene on the left of the face, “ONE PESO” in the center and “1” on the right.
  • The 5 pesos has the Roman numeral “V” on the left, the plantation scene in the center and “FIVE” on the right.
  • The 10 pesos note has the Roman numeral “X” on the left, TEN PESOS in the middle and the plantation scene on the right.
  • The back of all the notes have an ornate design, with the denomination both spelled out and in numeral form.

Varieties for the Peso denominated Philippines JIM Notes are

Interesting to note:
Counterfeit notes were made by the Allies for the first series.  They were to be supplied to the Philippine guerrillas fighting the Japanese.  Only the first series of JIM was counterfeited.  Ten million pesos were ordered, and 8.3 million pesos were made available for distribution. It is the author’s hope to cover these counterfeits in a separate post. 

Series 2 – Rizal Peso Issues (Currently being updated by the author)

The second series for the Philippines are also known as Rizal Monument notes. A hyperinflation had taken place which forced the Japanese government to also issue notes in higher denominations for this series (100, 500 and 1000 Pesos)

The notes come in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 100, 500 and 1000 pesos. These notes were well-printed and have an engraved face and lithographed back. With the exception of the 1000 Peso note they all have a vignette of the Rizal Monument, “THE JAPANESE GOVERNMENT”, a banana tree watermark and the denomination printed and in numeral form on the face. On the back of all the notes you will find the denomination spelled out and in numeral form. The 10 Peso note also has the Roman numeral X for the number 10. The notes have red block numbers and serial numbers.

  • On the face of the 1 and 5 pesos notes is the Rizal Monument on the left, the numeral and printed denomination in the center and the watermark, with a faint overprint of the denomination, on the right.
  • The face of the 10 pesos has “10” on the left with the watermark, “TEN PESOS” in the center, and the Rizal Monument on the right.
  • The face of the 100 pesos has the watermark on the left, with a faint “ONE HUNDRED” overprint, “100” in the center and the Rizal Monument on the right.

Series 2 – The Inflationary denominations

These notes, which were poorly executed, are in values of 100, 500 and 1,000 pesos. Both sides of these notes are lithographed and they have block letters but no serial numbers. The face of all the notes has “THE JAPANESE GOVERNMENT” and the denomination spelled out and in numeral form.

  • On the 100 peso note, “100 PESOS” is found in the center, with “100” repeated on an ornamental design around the edges on the face and back of that note. *** The 100 pesos note is very rare ***
  • The face of the 500 pesos has the watermark on the left with a faint “FIVE HUNDRED” overprint, “FIVE HUNDRED PESOS” below “500 PESOS” in the center, and the Rizal Monument on the right. The back has the denomination spelled out in the center and “500” in the four corners on an ornate design.
  • The 1,000 pesos note has “1000 PESOS” in the center with “1000” repeated in the corners on an ornamental design, on the face and back. The back also has the leaves of a plant on the right and left of the denomination.

Check list and gallery coming soon!

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